Coffee on Campus

Posted: May 18, 2011 in Miscellaneous
Tags: ,

Coffee. Coffee! Coffee? The saviour for many students during exams as it helps you stay alert and brighten up your study breaks. But what’s on the Uni Café Menus?  Cappuccino? Flat white?  Are you, just like I, a beginner in the coffee and espresso world? Here’s a list of what the most common coffee/espresso beverages consist of:

Caffè Latte  – is often called just latte, which means “milk” in Italian. Its made out of one-third espresso and nearly two-thirds steamed milk and is traditionally topped with a foam created from steaming milk.

Cappuccino – Equal parts of  espresso coffee, milk and foam which makes the coffee flavor stronger than the latte. This coffee drink is sometimes sprinkled with cinnamon or cocoa powder.

Flat White – A uniquely Australian coffee, consisting of one part espresso and two parts of steam milk.

Caffè macchiato – An espresso with a little steamed milk added on top. If you say “long” macchiato you get a double espresso.

Latte macchiato – The inverse of a caffè macchiato (ei a little bit of espresso poured into milk)

Mocha – This is a latte with chocolate added

Americano – Made with espresso with hot water added to give a similar strength to brewed coffee

Long black – This coffee drink is most common in Australia and New Zealand and is similar to the Americano but prepared in a different order (espresso added to water instead of vice versa)

Kere Kere

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Comments
  1. Tino says:

    Different countries – different coffee-culture!
    In AUSTRIA (no cangaroos, but skiing) we have a lot of coffee-houses and the so called “coffee-culture” is unigue! We do have all these kinds of coffee, but with some differences. Pay attention:

    Cappuccino: Can be the same as in Italy, but if you’re in Vienna you often get it with whipped cream instead of foam.

    Melange: That’s a Vienna-Classic! Same as the italian cappuccino, with a little bit more milk in it.

    But the most important thing with coffee (in whatever form) is the conversation!!! The best coffee in the world is nothing without a great conversation besides…

  2. Hello Tino!

    I wouldn’t mind having one of those austrian cappuccinos – Sounds great! I once visited Vienna and a friend of mine took me to this charming little place called Hawelka. There I got a taste of the real Vienna “coffe-culture”. I would love to come back one day! Vienna is beutiful!

    • Tino says:

      I heard something about that place!! It’s awesome 😉 Probably the best coffee-place in town! Literature history was made there…
      And you should definitely go back to Vienna!!!

  3. chanel says:

    I love being loyal to coffee shops, when the person serving you remembers your order, when the pay time conversation goes deeper than a “hey what can i get for you”. charasmatic baristers can make your smile last for longer than the coffees stimulating effects. I choose long black, the strong rich aroma gives me stamina to study, that extra push in the gym. It’s a fundamental part of who I am, though too much of a good thing can give you heart palpitations…

    • Hi Chanel!

      I agree! The person serving you have a very important role at the coffee shop. Which coffee shop is your favorit on campus? I like kere kere and the one with red cups (can’t remember the name right now) =)

      Josefin

  4. Tania says:

    This is a really helpful guide. I remember I didn’t know the difference between ‘long’ and ‘short’. I only wanted the coffee for the caffeine and was struck with incredible bitterness when I said ‘long’. For those that don’t really like the taste of coffee, but would still like a little caffeine hit, go for the mocha. Add a bit of sugar if it’s still too strong.

    • Hello Tania!
      Thanks for your comment! The mocca is delicious but I usally go for the latte. In Sweden we only drink brewed coffee at Uni which is good because it doesn’t contain milk. It’s healthier and we are, just like you, only after that caffeine effect. 🙂

  5. chanel says:

    The coffee shop i go to depends on the area im in at the time, its difficult to get a long black wrong 😛 When im dashing to get to my 8am lecture i usually stop off at micheles in melbourne central, i really like the bold taste of the coffee. if i have a biology prac or a chem lecture first up then i will go to the coffee stand near the physics podium. they have very cool loyalty cards where you get treats progressively such as a chocolate bar one day, or a free flavour in your drink. i also like them because they seem very environmentally aware. another fun thing to do at that coffee stand is listen to conversations, not in a strange stalkerish way, just top catch a glimpse of later university life, as ther is often PHD students around.
    my other favorite is the coffee shop outside of the eastern presinct centre. i spend a lot of my time there so its pretty important to have a good coffee shop nearby. and i quite enjoy the brew. i will always remember the time i was very tired and thirsty and asked for an extra large long black… the man serving me was like uhh.. thats like 4 shots of coffee. i though that cant be that much :P… needless to say i was not able to sit still during my subsiquent physics and biology lectures.

  6. Stacy says:

    I’ve found that having soy lattes is better than milk ones, because I can’t seem to stomach the dairy in the morning!
    Then again, I do love a nice frothy cappucino after class on a cold day 🙂

  7. Kylie T. says:

    Okay, I understand that the image of a university student is someone who is constantly studying late and in a hurry to get an assignment in etc. However, is it necessary to constantly promote coffee as the answer to your problems? Like in Farrago, there was a similar post, about where to find the best tasting coffee on campus. Shouldn’t we be reading about healthy lifestyle type articles? Like ‘the university offers yoga classes by the Buddahist club and this is why you should take it etc.’ Or articles about the other services offered to the students.

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